The day Donald Trump stopped being the leader of the free world ǀ View | Euronews


Donald Trump has been telling us since the first day of his presidency that the American president should no longer be the leader of the free world and that he personally has no interest in the job. This month, he made good on his words by unleashing chaos in northern Syria.

Trump’s actions empowered American adversaries ranging from the Islamic State militant group to Iran, Russia, Turkey and the regime of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad and abandoned the local Syrian forces, especially Kurdish ones, who fought side by side with U.S. troops against ISIS. In defending his decision, Trump insisted America has nothing at stake in Syria and can let others handle an Islamic State insurgency.

This ingratitude not only will do lasting damage to America’s reputation as a trustworthy ally, it also rejects the importance of American foreign goals more than seven decades in the making: containing an expansionist Russia; supporting allies, particularly those most likely to embrace democracy and human rights; and orienting U.S. policy away from the pre-WWII fiction that Americans at home will be safe from threats abroad — whether China, Iran or ISIS — if the U.S. would only retreat from the world.

 

Source: The day Donald Trump stopped being the leader of the free world ǀ View | Euronews

House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria pullout | TheHill


The House on Wednesday approved a resolution formally rebuking President Trump over his decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria.

The measure passed in a 354-60 vote, with four lawmakers voting present. All 60 votes against the resolution came from Republicans, with the present votes coming from three GOP lawmakers and Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.). The top three House Republicans supported the motion in a rare split from the president.

The resolution — which was sponsored by House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) and the panel’s top Republican, Rep. Michael McCaul (Texas) — “opposes the decision to end certain United States efforts to prevent Turkish military operations against Syrian Kurdish forces in Northeast Syria.”

The measure also calls on Turkey to end its military action, calls on the United States to protect the Kurds and calls on the White House “to present a clear and specific plan for the enduring defeat of ISIS.”

“The measure we’re considering today will send an unambiguous bipartisan, hopefully bicameral rejection of Trump’s policy in Syria,” Engel said ahead of the vote.

Trump has ordered all U.S. troops in northern Syria to pull back, paving the way for Turkey to launch an offensive against Kurdish forces that were instrumental in the U.S.-led fight against the ISIS.

The decision was swiftly condemned by lawmakers in both parties as abandoning the Kurds, signaling to future partners the United States is untrustworthy and enabling ISIS to resurge in the chaos.

The House’s resolution came to the floor under suspension of the rules, meaning it needed two-thirds approval to pass. The measure garnered support from all Democrats and 129 Republicans.

While the resolution breaks with Trump’s decision, Trump is named just once in the measure when it notes he spoke with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Oct. 6.

 

Source: House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria pullout | TheHill

IS bride Shamima Begum full transcript: ‘It was nice at first, like in the videos’ | UK News | Sky News


Sky News has spoken to IS bride Shamima Begum in an exclusive interview just hours after she gave birth to a baby boy in a Syrian refugee camp.

The 19-year-old was one of three schoolgirls from Bethnal Green in east London who travelled to Syria to join the Islamic State in 2015.

Sky correspondent John Sparks interviewed the teenager at the refugee camp.

Here is the full exchange:

Tell me a bit about the child.

It’s a boy. I named him after my old son [who died] – that’s what my husband wanted.

What are conditions like in the camp?

 

Source: IS bride Shamima Begum full transcript: ‘It was nice at first, like in the videos’ | UK News | Sky News

Ultimately, Begum is a distraction. The main issue is not terrorists’ brides, but terrorists themselves. Where are they? | Conservative Home


There are three main takes on Sajid Javid’s recent decision to revoke Shamima Begum’s British citizenship.  The first is tabloid. (Good on yer, Saj!)  The second is broadsheet.  (Frightful! Uncivilised!)  The third is merely cynical.  The Home Secretary, this view has it, wins either way.  If the courts uphold his decision, he gets the credit.  And if they don’t, those limp-wristed, bleeding-heart, liberal elite judges get the blame.  Either way, he wins – and up go his ratings in the ConservativeHome Cabinet League Table.

We are as world-weary as the next media outlet.  So we suspect that the impact of this decision on his future leadership prospects will have floated across Javid’s mind.  But one soon grasps, on trying to think it all through, that there is much more to his decision than that.

Let’s start by focusing on Begum herself – this exploited, warped, unrepentant, atypical and seemingly not-very-bright teenager who is evidently as much of a stranger to British norms as she is to the traditional, classical Islam.  She fled Britain when she was 15, married a Dutch jihadi, and reportedly now has a baby, two of her children already being dead.

 

Source: Ultimately, Begum is a distraction. The main issue is not terrorists’ brides, but terrorists themselves. Where are they? | Conservative Home

No, Trump is not like Obama on Middle East policy : The Conversation


On Jan. 6, National Security Advisor John Bolton walked back President Donald Trump’s announcement that the U.S. would quickly withdraw U.S. troops from Syria, saying that such a withdrawal might actually take months or years.

Trump’s announcement came more than two weeks earlier. Soon after, Trump also directed the Pentagon to halve the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

Whatever the fate of either order, pundits and politicians are having a field day comparing Trump’s Middle East policy to that of Barack Obama.

“On this issue…there is more continuity between Trump and Obama than would make either administration comfortable,” Richard N. Haas, president of The Council on Foreign Relations, told The New York Times in an article headlined “A Strategy of Retreat in Syria, with Echoes of Obama.”

The next day, The Hill repeated the sentiment in an article whose headline holds nothing back: “Trump’s Middle East Policy Looks a lot Like Obama’s – That’s not a Good Thing.”

Even Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), whose support for Trump is matched only by his disdain for Obama’s Middle East policy, called Trump’s plan “an Obama-like mistake.”

As someone who has studied and written about the Middle East for more than 30 years, this comparison immediately struck me as wrong.

While both presidents have advocated decreasing America’s footprint in the region, I believe their policies are comparable only on the most superficial level. Understanding why enables us to see the fundamental flaw underlying the current policy.

Trump vs. Obama: Afghanistan

Obama and Trump have taken contrasting approaches to the Afghanistan war, America’s longest. Both favored troop withdrawal – but with different intentions.

 

Source: No, Trump is not like Obama on Middle East policy : The Conversation

The EU paid for a 764km wall between Turkey & Syria to stop people fleeing the Syrian civil war – and no one is talking about it | Nye Bevan News


“This is not Donald Trump’s desired border wall between the USA and Mexico, nor is it Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orbán’s fence which stops the flow of migrants into Europe – this is a 764 kilometre wall between Turkey and Syria, funded by none other than the European Union.”

Step 1: Blair, Bush, Obama & Cameron destabalise the Middle East.
Step 2: ISIS move into the power vacuum, creating civil strife.
Step 3: The victims flee to Europe.
Step 4: The EU pays Turkey to build a wall to stop them.
Step 5: Nobody talks about it, especially the pro EU critics of Trump.

Blair (pro EU), Cameron (pro EU), May (pro EU) – it’s amazing how Liberal the EU was with free movement right up until the non white people whose countries we destroyed started freely moving across Europe.

The idea that Leave voters get called racist and ignorant is pretty twisted, in light of these facts.

 

Source: The EU paid for a 764km wall between Turkey & Syria to stop people fleeing the Syrian civil war – and no one is talking about it | Nye Bevan News

Putin Warns Of Global “Chaos” If West Hits Syria Again : The Daily Steeple


Shortly after US Ambassador Nikki Haley revealed that Russia would be slapped with a third round of sanctions on Monday for “enabling the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons in civil war,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said that further attacks on Syria by Western forces, “in violation of the U.N. Charter,” would send international relations into “chaos.”

In a telephone conversation with his Iranian counterpart, Hassan Rouhani, Putin and Rouhani agreed that the Western strikes had damaged the chances of achieving a political resolution in the seven-year Syria conflict, according to a Kremlin statement. –Reuters

 

Source: Putin Warns Of Global “Chaos” If West Hits Syria Again : The Daily Steeple

The ‘anti-imperialism’ of idiots


Syria is but one of many conflicts around the world, but some gain publicity while others do not to the extent of Syria, such as Myanmar and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and many more.

Why do these atrocities occur and why can we not all live in peace?

Is it the grab for power and the fear of losing it by certain people that creates all this. Some overthrow their Government due to the atrocities that have been occurring only then to create more and sometimes similar atrocities themselves, could this be a human trait?

Leila's blog

DavOd8fWkAA2loL Cartoon criticizing selective outrage which only applies to chemical attacks, by Yaser

Once more the western ‘anti-war’ movement has awoken to mobilise around Syria. This is the third time since 2011. The first was when Obama contemplated striking the Syrian regime’s military capability (but didn’t) following chemical attacks on the Ghouta in 2013, considered a ‘red line’. The second time was when Donald Trump ordered a strike which hit an empty regime military base in response to chemical attacks on Khan Sheikhoun in 2017. And today, as the US, UK and France take limited military action (targeted strikes on regime military assets and chemical weapons facilities) following a chemical weapons attack in Douma which killed at least 34 people, including many children who were sheltering in basements from bombing.

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Echoes of Spain 1936 with call for international solidarity against Turkish aggression


Every area of population has a right to defend themselves from aggression from forces outwith that area, especially when then aggression from another country.

The Turkish authorities may be retaliating to a perceived threat, but this perceived threat would be from a minority and not the majority of any area. To subject any aggression to the majority should never be allowed.

The World should denounce the Turkish authorities for this illegal act of aggression to a population who have only recently come through many other actions of aggression.

Please allow the population of Afrin and other Kurdish areas to now live in peace.

UndercoverInfo

A women’s army has mobilised to defend the people of the mainly Kurdish-populated Afrin province of northern Syria against the invading Turkish military. This coincides with a call to arms by the international volunteer brigades which, alongside Kurds and their allies, have helped liberate whole swathes of Syria from Daesh (Isis/Isil)

To read more, click here.

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Towards a federal Kurdish state in Syria?


So we go on there has been so much bloodshed, destruction and whole communities put under brutal regimes, so I do hope that this can be resolved peacefully.

The Kurds have, apparently been under the control of a number of forces for many years, be they Turkish, Syrian and now, hopefully, lastly ISIS.

The Kurds need to have a say in how they now go forward, but this should be between the Kurds and Syria and no outside force. If the Kurds ‘want a federal system that would allow regions to rule themselves without central control by the center’. It appears Syria may be agreeable to this and it appears they will be supported by Russia. However, for some reason the US appear to be opposed to this, well that they can be, but they should in no way impose this opinion onto the Kurds and Syrians.

The Western power have far too long imposed their views into areas that should not be theirs to do so, therefore the US needs to back off completely and just concentrate on their own troubles at home.