Average pay has fallen for millions of lower and middle income workers since 2010, TUC research says – inews.co.uk


Average pay has effectively fallen for millions of lower and middle income earners over the past decade, research has found.

Austerity and a lack of bargaining rights had held down pay in many jobs, according to the Trades Union Congress (TUC).

Real pay for earners in jobs paying between £9.56 and £12.73 an hour has dropped by 1 per cent since 2010.

This compares with a seven per cent increase for this group between 2002 and 2010.

 

Source: Average pay has fallen for millions of lower and middle income workers since 2010, TUC research says – inews.co.uk

Philip Hammond plans world’s highest minimum wage | Society | The Guardian


Philip Hammond is seriously considering a major increase to the minimum wage as he seeks to secure a legacy of ending low pay, it has emerged.

Several sources familiar with the chancellor’s thinking told the Observer they believed he was pushing to look at the “ambitious end” of what would be possible without damaging Britain’s employment levels, suggesting he is contemplating going further than any developed nation.

A proposal under discussion would see the minimum wage pushed up to 66% of median earnings, meeting the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s definition of low pay. It would allow the chancellor to say he had set a course to end low pay in Britain. The chancellor held a meeting with Frances O’Grady, general secretary of the Trades Union Congress (TUC), last week, and he is understood to be meeting other union leaders at a round table this week. One government source said: “The chancellor is very concerned about poverty and sees this as one avenue of tackling it.”

 

Source: Philip Hammond plans world’s highest minimum wage | Society | The Guardian

The War and Socialist Demands for a National Health Service before the Beveridge Report


Beastrabban\'s Weblog

This is following a debate I’ve recently had with a critic, who stated that the National Health Service had its origins in the Beveridge Report of 1942, and was endorsed by Winston Churchill and the Conservatives. This is true, up to a point, though Churchill was initially very cautious about the foundation of a National Health Service. After the War he made a radio speech denouncing the Labour party’s plans for a complete reconstruction of Britain as ‘a Gestapo for England’. However, Michael Sullivan in his book, The Development of the British Welfare State (Hemel Hempstead: Prentice Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf 1996) also points out that before the publication of the Beveridge, there had been a long process of negotiation and demand for some kind of comprehensive, free healthcare for working people, and that this had become official Labour party policy in the 1934. He writes

Discussions about the reform of British…

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