I’m a lung doctor testing the blood from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century old idea that could be a fast track to treatment : The Conversation


In the blood of COVID-19 survivors are antibodies that can defeat SARS-CoV-2. Researchers are testing whether these antibodies can be collected and injected into others to save them from the virus.

Source: I’m a lung doctor testing the blood from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century old idea that could be a fast track to treatment : The Conversation

Sensory overload: Symptoms, causes, and treatment : Medical News Today


Sensory overload is the over stimulation of one or more of the body’s senses. It often affects people with certain conditions, such as autism or ADHD. Learn more.

Source: Sensory overload: Symptoms, causes, and treatment : Medical News Today

Childhood schizophrenia: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment : Medical News Today


Schizophrenia usually starts in adulthood, but it can sometimes affect children. Find out how to recognize it and the treatments available.

Source: Childhood schizophrenia: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment : Medical News Today

Bipolar vs. ADHD: Symptoms and differences : Medical News Today


Bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are two distinct health conditions. They share some similar symptoms but have several key differences.

ADHD is more common than bipolar disorder. As the two conditions can coexist, misdiagnosis can occur.

In this article, we compare bipolar disorder and ADHD. Read on to learn about the symptoms of each and how they can overlap. We also explain treatments and when to see a doctor.

Bipolar vs. ADHD

 

Source: Bipolar vs. ADHD: Symptoms and differences : Medical News Today

PIP Assessors Treat Sick People Like Criminals.


‘Hannah, from Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, told i: “I was made to feel like a liar when I asked for help. I want the Government to know what they’re doing to us, what they’re putting us through. They treat sick people like criminals.”’, which is not technically correct for Criminals are presumed innocent until the Justice system proves otherwise, whereas PIP claimants are assumed guilty until the claimant can prove otherwise.

So, in effect PIP claimants are being treated worse than criminals.

Conduct disorder: Symptoms, treatment, and causes : Medical News Today


Conduct disorder is a mental health condition that affects children and adolescents. It is characterized by a behavioral pattern in which the child breaks age-appropriate social norms and rules.

Along with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder is considered a disruptive behavior disorder and it is one of the most common mental health disorders diagnosed in young people.

Young people with this condition can be cruel and violent towards others, including pets and other animals. They may be destructive, breaking and damaging property.

The behavior associated with conduct disorder is not limited to occasional outbursts. It is consistent and repetitive, occurring frequently enough that it interferes with the child’s education, family life, and social life.

Fast facts on conduct disorder:

 

Source: Conduct disorder: Symptoms, treatment, and causes : Medical News Today

Decoding Your Defiant Child: Understanding Oppositional ADHD


40 percent of children with ADHD also develop oppositional defiant disorder, a condition marked by chronic aggression, frequent outbursts, and a tendency to argue, ignore requests, and engage in an…

Source: Decoding Your Defiant Child: Understanding Oppositional ADHD

NHS ranked ‘number one’ health system | DisabledGo News and Blog


The UK health service was praised for its safety, affordability and efficiency, but fared less well on outcomes such as preventing early death and cancer survival. The research by the Commonwealth Fund, a US think tank, looked at countries across the world, including the US, Canada, Australia, France and Germany. The US came bottom. It is the second time in a row that the UK has finished top. Three years ago, when the survey was last done, the UK was also number one. It comes despite the NHS being in the grip of the tightest financial squeeze in its history with lengthening waiting times. The good and the bad The NHS was praised for the safety of its care, the systems in place to prevent ill-health, such as vaccinations and screening, the speed at which people get help and that there was equitable access regardless of income. Only in one of the five themes looked at did the NHS perform poorly compared with the other nations – health outcomes. This covers general health of

Source: NHS ranked ‘number one’ health system | DisabledGo News and Blog

My Aspergers Child: Hypotonia in Kids on the Autism Spectrum


“My 10 year-old child with high-functioning autism is very smart, but he is very, very poorly coordinated. He has difficulty riding his bike, bowling, catching, hitting a tennis ball, kicking, shooting a basketball, diving in a pool, swinging a bat, and throwing. He can’t run fast without tripping, and he has terrible posture. As an infant, he was a later walker (almost 17 months). He was a very sloppy eater, and still has trouble cutting with a knife or the edge of his fork. Also, he had some speech articulation issues. We were hoping he would grow out of all this, but he hasn’t. I wonder if there is anything we could do to help him be less awkward. Does what I’ve described sound “normal” for some children with autism? Or does it sound concerning? How physically uncoordinated should he be before we try to get professional help for him?”

Many children with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) have a comorbid condition called Hypotonia, which is sometimes referred to as “floppiness.” This is because the muscles are meant to help support the skeletal system and are designed to prevent certain kinds of motion. Because the muscles are not especially tight, children with Hypotonia frequently experience “hypermobility” (i.e., the ability to move limbs into awkward positions). They often find that they’re able to very easily carry out feats that require flexibility, but not strength or balance (e.g., splits, back-bending, shoulder rotation, etc.). Also, they may display uncommon flexibility in other joints (e.g., fingers).

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Hypotonia in Kids on the Autism Spectrum