When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking


This article looks at the vaccines for children and it appears that work has already been started or is soon to start, but there is still, at least, one other area and this is for adults with learning disabilities (Intellectual Disabilities) and Autism who are needle averse, for in this area needle injections are not possible.

The adults are very vulnerable, but as I see it there is no work taking place in that direction.

With regards to Flu these adults can be given the nasal spray, which is generally given to children under 12 years, but it is not as effective as the injection, but something is better than nothing.

 

Source: When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking

What’s wrong with those anti-vaxxers? They’re just like the rest of us : The Conversation


Whenever I talk about my research on how parents come to decide to reject vaccines for their children, my explanations are met with a range of reactions, but I almost always hear the same questions.

What is wrong with those parents? Are they anti-science? Are they anti-expert? Are they simply ignorant or selfish? Are they crazy?

The year is not half over, and the number of measles cases has now exceeded highs not seen since the U.S. was declared measles-free in 2000. Given the indisputably large role unvaccinated individuals are playing in it, parents who reject vaccines are increasingly vilified. Some people call to have these parents arrested or punished. Many are asking states to tighten laws that make exemptions to school enrollment without vaccines too easy.

Others dismiss these “Whole Foods moms” as harming others and call for them to be socially ostracized.

As a sociologist, I have spent most of a decade talking to parents, pediatricians, policymakers, lawyers and scientists to understand competing views of vaccines. In my research, I find that parents who reject vaccines – by which I mean mostly mothers – work hard to make what they see as an informed decision to do what they think is best for their children. They also want to make a decision that best aligns with their belief system.

Experts, at least of their own kids

Many “anti-vax” parents see themselves as experts on their own children, as best able to decide what their children need and whether their child needs a particular vaccine, and better qualified than health experts or public health agencies to decide what is best for their family.

 

Source: What’s wrong with those anti-vaxxers? They’re just like the rest of us : The Conversation

Why do I now agree with vaccination? My experience : Medical News Today


I’m Lana Burgess, a 31-year-old freelance writer passionate about well-being. In this article, I explore why I disagree with my mom’s decision not to vaccinate me when I was a child — and how, as an adult, I decided to finally get vaccinated.

It was just after 3 p.m., and school was done for the day.

My classmates were all whooping and bounding about the playground, stopping to wave as their parents arrived to collect them. I spied my mom and ran over to her.

On the way home, she told me that I would not be going in tomorrow; instead, I was going to stay home.

As a child who loved school, my heart sank. My mom said that I had to stay at home because the other children would be getting their measles vaccine tomorrow.

 

Source: Why do I now agree with vaccination? My experience : Medical News Today

The startling rise in oral cancer in men, and what it says about our changing sexual habits – The Washington Post


The most dramatic increases were in throat cancer and tongue cancer, according to FAIR Health.

Source: The startling rise in oral cancer in men, and what it says about our changing sexual habits – The Washington Post

The MMR Vaccination Debate – a Parental Perspective


A sensitive subject and thank you for your insight.

No vaccine can be 100% safe, as can no other medical procedure, but one needs to assess, do the advantages outweigh any disadvantages or not and then decide accordingly.

As the mother of an Autistic child, I can’t help but put my two cents worth in on the recent uprising of controversy surrounding the outbreak of measles and the risk of administering the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination. I do believe I have a rather uncommon perspective on the matter. Unique? Maybe not. Nevertheless, here it is.

When my first son (who is completely “normal”) was one year old we went in for his MMR shot and the doctor suggested that I be immunized at the same time. Much to my regret, I did; I found out a few weeks later that I had been two weeks pregnant with my second son when I had the shot. When my second, Chris, was born everything seemed fine. He was developing according to his milestones and even beyond them. He spoke a few words and played normally. Then, at one year…

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