Archives for posts with tag: vulnerable people

The UK is approaching a perfect storm with an ageing population and many people unprepared for the future

Former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister Ed Davey (centre) and campaigners protest against Theresa May’s social care policy during the 2017 general election campaign. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

For a short while, it seemed like the issue of social care funding would finally be addressed after years of government procrastination. The Conservatives promised a consultation on social care reformU-turned on the so-called dementia tax and, instead, confirmed their intention to cap the amount people pay towards care.

But now that plans to introduce such a cap have been scrapped and the social care consultation is rumoured to have been delayed until next summer, it seems that the government has followed previous administrations and kicked social care funding into the long grass.

Such a decision is worrying and flies in the face of public opinion. A cap on care costs will increase the fairness of social care, so it’s risky to turn our backs on this idea without an alternative plan in place. There are too many vulnerable older people at risk.

Following an election campaign full of confusing messages about social care, Anchor, England’s largest not-for-profit provider of care and housing for older people, conducted a public poll to gather insight into people’s understanding. Our research found that 70% of British adults believe there should be a cap on social care costs, while almost half believe that social care – including dementia care – should always be paid for by the state.

Sir Andrew Dilnot, who first proposed a cap on social care, has cautioned that plans to abandon it could cause a “catastrophic risk” of poverty in older age. And councils have warned that they cannot afford to pay for all those in need of state-funded care if the dementia tax is introduced, putting many providers at risk of going out of business.

The question of how we fund social care remains unanswered, and the most recent suggestions fail to get to the crux of the issue.

Jackie Doyle-Price, the social care minister, suggested that older people should sell their homes to fund their care. But this doesn’t take the full picture into account. There is a perception that all or most older people are well-off and own their own home – this isn’t the case. For those older people who are home owners and are, to quote the minister, “sitting in homes too big for their needs”, we know that two thirds would like to downsize but can’t due to a lack of suitable options.

Again, this comes down to a lack of funding and supportive policies, despite the fact that more retirement housing could save £14.5bn to the public purse over 50 years.

Whichever direction the future of social care funding is heading, and whether a cap is introduced or not, the government must be open and honest about how social care will be paid for so that everyone can plan for the best possible life in older age. At present, this is far from the case.

More than a fifth of people wrongly believe the state pays entirely for care needs in later life, and more than half underestimate social care costs by up to 20%. Considering these misconceptions, it’s no wonder that just 14% of us are currently saving for our care in later life.

We’re approaching a perfect storm where the future of social care funding is unclear, the population is getting older, and most of us are unprepared for the future. We need a transparent and sustainable long-term strategy that integrates social care, health and housing. Recognising, and acting on this, is our only option.

  • Jane Ashcroft is chief executive of Anchor

Source: Social care funding can’t take any more setbacks. It needs reform now : The Guardian

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Dentists warn that thousands of vulnerable people are wrongly being fined over dental treatment.

Source: ‘Go to the dentist and get fined £100’ – BBC News


A good question, is i that the banks were just an excuse at the time to implement Tory policy and if it was not the banks they would have found some other excuse.

We are not ‘all in it together’ the Cameron phrase, it is only the poor, the disabled, the sick, but not the Establishment who receive whatever situation the country is in.

The Government only cares for itself and those who it believes can help them, but the poor, the disabled and the sick are just wastage so far as the Government is concerned.

sdbast

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I agree that social care and related health should be administered by one just one authority, but should it be health or social services or should a completely new authority be formed.

As to whether independent social care providers are profiteering from the system I am not too sure for to have quality care does cost.

If Andy Burnham is stating that these social care providers should be run by either social services or health rather than independently, this I would seriously contest. The reason being than generally the most expensive providers are run by these authorities as the lowest paid would generally be paid no less than the Living Wage as opposed to the National Living Wage, their pensions would generally be better as these may still be based on final salaries as to contribution as is the newly created work portable pensions which are being rolled out to all employees who are currently not in a pensionable employment.

The management structures will generally be more expensive to run than in a private provider, but this would depend on the extent of the profit being extracted by the owners from their care company. But with the current state of social services and health finances due to Government austerity cuts the scope for excessive profits are being restrictive.

With regards to zero hours contracts and I agree that they should not used in practice, Local Authorities do use these for some of their workforce, but I am not sure about health.

What should be occurring is zero contracts should be outlawed, everyone should be paid at least the Living wage, which would make the National Living wage redundant. In addition retain the independent providers, but insist on a effective quality control system, which should be independently monitored outwith the care provider, be they independent, Local Authority or health.

There are currently local independent HealthWatch organisation in all localities who do, at present, monitor Care home, GP surgeries, Pharmacies, Dentists and Opticians. Their remit should be extended to day services and all other care providers and their powers should be strengthened, for at present they can not insist to look at records kept by the respective organisations, unless the organisations offer them to the Enter and View representatives. Also they can only state recommendations, but these should be extended to be more than voluntary for the care providers to follow them.

Then the HealthWatch visits would be more on a par to the CQC (Care Quality Commission) inspections.


Although Frances Ryan is correct regarding the systematic erasure of adults with disabilities (Social care is not just about the elderly, 10 February), she misses the point as to the legal intention of David Mowat’s statement. The last group of disabled people in plain sight but relegated to non-existence except during Red Nose Day are of course disabled children and their carers, usually parents and family. Parents have a statutory duty of care towards their children, which adults do not have towards other adults, hence the government’s need to make it more palatable for adults to care for their elderly relatives. There is the perception that parent carers of disabled children, and their children, get the lion’s share of the care system. This is untrue. In fact, the opposite is true. It is disabled children who have lost out completely to adult care, with families and children being abandoned by the state, and indeed wider society, who view disabled people – adults and children –

Source: The social care system is failing too many | DisabledGo News and Blog


Adult social care is a huge challenge for this Government. underfunding, combined with shortages of nurses and care workers, is putting unprecedented strain on

Source: Social care underfunding leaves many vulnerable people with ‘post code’ basic care | Care Industry News


The guidelines for primary care registration should be clear for all concerned, as should the complaint procedures.

Some administrative and support staff follow their own guidance through ignorance of the correct procedures and this would more than likely be corrected by the practice management and GPs when they are made aware of it.

Current UK regulations to accessing Primary and Secondary care


benefitsdisabilitydwp

Source: ‘Confusion, obstruction and complexity’: How the DWP is denying vulnerable people justice


Ruling will halt thousands of applications involving those with learning disabilities who need treatment involving loss of liberty.

Source: Judge Challenges Government Over Legal Representation For Vulnerable People


finolamoss

The Francis report, identified systemic, organisational, and, individual failings contributed to “the normalisation of cruelty” in the care in Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust.

The 2012/13 Annual Report by Healthwatch England, showed 94% of the public agreed that the NHS, and social services, could be improved.

1 in 3 of public surveyed, said they knew someone, who they believed, had experienced a serious mistake, abuse, or a preventable illness, or death in a health, or social care service.

All local authorities have now combined with the NHS to form Health and Social Care Trusts.

Last year a report revealed 3 learning disabled a day, died needlessly in NHS care.

SLOVEN NHS, has just revealed,  it only investigated 1% of the deaths of the learning disabled in their care.

In justification of investigating only 1%, they stated;

“National data on mortality rates confirms that the Trust is not an outlier. We believe that…

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