Scotland Yard urge women to ‘wave down a bus’ if they are concerned about being approached by a lone male officer


The Metropolitan Police guidance was branded ‘laughable’ and ‘derisory’

 

============================================

Does Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave live and work in the real world, who in their right mind would challenge a lone  assumed Police officer, let alone a lone woman. It is not lone woman who needs to challenge, but fellow Police officers who should not blindly support their own colleagues for if something does not feel or sound right, then it is more than likely not to be right. For with their Police training they should be possible to spot a wrong , but has said they are more concerned at supporting colleagues rather than weeding out persons who should not be in the Police force.

A full investigation needs to be conducted to every force starting with the Met, so that bad officers can be found and dismissed before even more crimes are committed under the terms of the Law.

This needs to be done starting both at the top and the bottom. With recruiting becoming even more stringent.

It is also evident that sexual is not the only area, but as much so racism, gender, culture and many other aspects and not forgetting ‘Secret Society’ involvement.

 

 

Source: Scotland Yard urge women to ‘wave down a bus’ if they are concerned about being approached by a lone male officer

Toilet provision for men and women: call for evidence – GOV.UK


I welcome this consultation for currently I am unaware of any public toilets where I live in Sheffield, except those in some large stores, who are closed due to the lockdown, although there toilets in supermarkets, which in some areas are few and far between, especially in city centres.

Hoping this consultation will change the trend for many years, where public toilets have been closed. Was this down to finance and if so, was this due to the 10 years of austerity cuts imposed on Local Authorities by the past Conservative Governments?

We do have some Changing Places toilets, but again there is an insufficiency, which needs to be rectified.

 

Source: Toilet provision for men and women: call for evidence – GOV.UK

Donald Trump and Masculinity as Motivator | History Matters


Thank you, a great insight to the image, ego, etc. of Trump. How anyone can support him is beyond my comprehension, but support him they do.

In addition to your insight, is it not true, that his supporters have no one other than Trump to cling to and to cast him out would mean they are on their own, which they feel they have been for far too long.

He is their last hope, in some ways their ‘Messiah’.

I do feel sorry for his supporters, that they have felt so alone and have to cling to Trump, the worst of ‘Mankind’.

Source: Donald Trump and Masculinity as Motivator | History Matters

A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation


Young men make up the majority of black people killed by police in the US. That’s fed a perception that black women are somehow shielded from the threat of police violence. They aren’t.

Source: A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation

The Cyprus rape case is a chilling reminder of the price women pay for speaking up | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian


It is impossible to feel justice has been done for the British teenager in the Cyprus rape case, says Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff

Source: The Cyprus rape case is a chilling reminder of the price women pay for speaking up | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian

The Cyprus case shows how easily rape victims are let down and distrusted | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian


Treating women as untrustworthy witnesses is almost universal, says chair of the Mayor of London’s Violence Against Women and Girls Board Joan Smith

Source: The Cyprus case shows how easily rape victims are let down and distrusted | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian

Number of women dying in childbirth way off track to meet worldwide targets | Global development | The Guardian


The number of women dying in pregnancy and childbirth has fallen by more than a third since 2000, according to new UN figures, but the rate of decline remains way off track to meet global targets to cut maternal deaths.

In the US maternal death rates have increased by over 50% and progress in reducing deaths in the 10 countries with the highest rates has slowed since 2000.

Figures published on Thursday show that in 2017 an estimated 295,000 women died from complications in pregnancy and childbirth, compared with 451,000 at the turn of the century. Globally, the maternal mortality ratio – the number of deaths per 100,000 live births – now stands at 211, compared with 342 in 2000.

While the decrease was welcomed, there are concerns that the slow pace of change means reaching the target in the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) of no more than 70 deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030, would be unlikely.

The pace of decline since 2015, when the SDGs were agreed, has been particularly slow.

Poverty, inadequate and sometimes expensive health services and a lack of political will are among the main reasons for the deaths, which are often preventable with the right care.

Anneka Knutsson, chief of the UN population fund (UNFPA) sexual and reproductive branch, said: “Although it’s true that more women and children are surviving today, the slight decrease in maternal deaths between 2015 and 2017 is deeply concerning.”

The new statistics, she said, suggested the SDG target would not be reached “unless we dramatically increase and accelerate our efforts to improve maternal health care by bolstering overall sexual and reproductive healthcare”.

 

Source: Number of women dying in childbirth way off track to meet worldwide targets | Global development | The Guardian

This abortion law isn’t what Ireland voted for | Emer O’Toole | Opinion | The Guardian


In 1983, as the Irish electorate voted in favour of a constitutional ban on abortion, campaigners warned in bold print: “This Amendment Could Kill Women.”

It did.

Following the tragedy of Savita Halappanavar’s death in 2012, Irish politicians were forced to legislate on a 20-year-old supreme court decision, one that consecutive governments had conspicuously kicked into the long grass. In 1992, a judge had ruled that a suicidal teenage rape victim had the right to an abortion. When the government finally produced the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013, it was so clearly unfit for purpose that the Abortion Rights Campaign doubted it would enable a suicidal teenage rape victim to access a termination at all.

 

Source: This abortion law isn’t what Ireland voted for | Emer O’Toole | Opinion | The Guardian

Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian


It was a mere scrap of fabric, deep blue and edged with lace. But when the legislator Ruth Coppinger drew it from her sleeve and held it up in the Irish parliament this week, the item of women’s underwear caused consternation among her colleagues.

Elsewhere, women took to the streets carrying lingerie. In Cork, dozens of thongs were laid on the steps of the courthouse. In Belfast on Thursday, protesters tied knickers to placards and chanted: “My little black dress does not mean yes.”

Thousands of women posted pictures of their underwear on Twitter under the hashtags #IBelieveHer and #ThisIsNotConsent.

The trigger for protests across Ireland, and the eruption of fury on social media, was the words of a lawyer defending a man accused of rape in a trial in Cork.

Suggesting the complainant – 17-year-old woman – was “open to meeting someone”, Elizabeth O’Connell said: “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.”

The defendant was acquitted in a unanimous verdict following deliberations by the jury lasting 90 minutes.

According to Fiona Ryan, a city councillor in Cork, anger over the defence counsel’s comments on 6 November took a few days to build.

“It didn’t blow up at first, it was almost a delayed reaction. But it festered,” she said. Ryan suggested staging a protest in Cork on Wednesday, eight days after the end of the trial, and was astonished when up to 500 people turned up to take part, many carrying items of underwear.

 

Source: Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian