End mass jabs and live with Covid, says ex-head of vaccine taskforce | Coronavirus | The Guardian


Dr Clive Dix says we should treat the virus like flu

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To some extent I do agree with Dr Clive Dix, but to do this all factors need to be equal to those of flu.

With flu other countries are not barring people from going there or requiring flu vaccinations to be taken.

As to the administering of COVID and flu vaccinations all are not equal, as with COVID there is only the injection process while with flu there are both injections and nasal sprays. While for the flu the nasal sprays are usually only given to children as they do not have the injections offered to them. But, there is an exception for some adults and these are for adults with learning disabilities and/or Autism who are averse to needles. For these persons the children’s nasal sprays are available and while not as fully effected as the injections they do offer some protection, which is better than none. However, currently for COVID-19 there are no nasal sprays, although I believe some are in the process of being research as are tablets and patches.

There are some nasal sprays which are said to be effective to COVID, but on investigation there generally offer no more protection than for the common cold, which is a very, very mild form of COVID, no way as virulent as the COVID-19 and the various variants.

To help some persons with learning disabilities who are needle averse there is some needle aversion therapies, but these are generally only to combat the actual needle injection and not any other reactions. For with some people the needle aversion is from past experiences where they did have needle injections for say, operations and the resultant outcomes of the operations are what is really the cause of the needle aversion. So, it is very unlikely that the needle aversion therapies will be effective in these instances, so until nasal sprays, tablets or patches will be available, these persons with needle aversions will remain unvaccinated.

So, currently all is not equal and will never be until the researches are complete and nasal sprays, tablets and patches are made available.

In fact if they were available they would be easier to administer than injections, as they would not normally require a suitably qualified person to do the administering which needle injections require. This would be of great advantage in many developing counties for not only would they be easier to administer, could well be self-administering, thereby no need to purchase to vaccine, but there would be no additional costs for a qualified person for the administering and more than likely no temperature storing requirements or not as extensive.

So to make all equal, patches, tablets and nasal sprays have to be universally available for everyone and this should be well before mass jabbing is stopped.

Source: End mass jabs and live with Covid, says ex-head of vaccine taskforce | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Government imposes new restrictions to fight Omicron as first cases found in UK | Coronavirus | The Guardian


Masks made mandatory in shops and on buses and trains, while new arrivals must take PCR tests

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The wearing of masks in shops and on buses and trains was never officially withdrawn, but the mandatory aspect was. However, some transport operatives made their own rules, such as, Transport for London, where they stated it was a requirement to travel on their buses and the Tube, but was it ever legally enforceable. Perhaps it was not, but the public should have respected the wishes of the operators.

In other parts of the UK, except England, Scotland and others did retain the mandatory aspect. I feel it was a grave mistake from Boris Johnson, one of many, when the mandatory aspect was withdrawn. For those not wearing masks are not acting with respect to their fellow travellers.

In fact, in many aspects social distancing should also have been retained.

The coming of Omicron is a great worry, as should be the coninuance of COVID in England, but this appears to nhave been ignored by many in England, so please do not ignore Omicron, for if you do Lockdowns will have to be reimposed. In fact, the reimposition has never gone away and would always be brought in, but perhaps, too late, as other measurers have been.

At least, the mandatory reintroduction was not delayed and the travel restrictions also.

Yes, we have to learn to live with COVID, but not at the expense of lives lost. Lives are much more important than refusing to live with a few restrictions. So accept the restrictions and in doing so save lives.

The same is also relevant in having the COVID vaccinations and where eligible the COVID booster and any others which will come along.

 

Source: Government imposes new restrictions to fight Omicron as first cases found in UK | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Government rejects call to give social workers and care staff priority access to petrol | Community Care


The government has rejected calls to give social workers and care staff priority access to fuel, amid petrol station closures across the country. Social workers and care staff are being impeded in their roles by a lack of fuel at petrol stations across the country, sector bodies and unions for the sector have warned. The […]

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Once again this just show the total disregard this Government has for Social Care, it is as though they do really wish that social care disappears and all those in need of social care deserved all the pain and suffering to which they will have coming to them.

This is totally not unexpected by this Government, but I do hope they all suffer in life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Government rejects call to give social workers and care staff priority access to petrol | Community Care

Lancaster University intranasal vaccine offers promise to block COVID-19 where it starts | Lancaster University


Research by Lancaster University scientists to create a COVID-19 vaccine which can be administered through the nose has taken a significant step forward.

Source: Lancaster University intranasal vaccine offers promise to block COVID-19 where it starts | Lancaster University

Covid-19: China pressured WHO team to dismiss lab leak theory, claims chief investigator | The BMJ


A World Health Organisation mission to study the covid pandemic’s origins in China, which announced in February that the possibility that the virus had escaped from a laboratory needed no further investigation,1 was put under pressure by Chinese scientists who made up half the team to reach that conclusion, the scientist who led the mission has said.Peter Ben Embarek, who led the scientists dispatched by WHO to Wuhan, told a Danish television documentary, broadcast on 12 August, that the Chinese scientists refused to even discuss the lab leak scenario2 unless the final report dismissed any need for further investigation.Having haggled about it until 48 hours before they left China, Ben Embarek said, his Chinese counterpart eventually agreed to discuss the lab leak theory in the report “on the condition we didn’t recommend any specific studies to further that hypothesis.”Discussing the team’s findings before leaving China, Ben Embarek told reporters that a lab leak was “extremely unlikely.” Asked by Denmark’s TV2 if that wording was …

Source: Covid-19: China pressured WHO team to dismiss lab leak theory, claims chief investigator | The BMJ

Tokyo doctors association calls for Olympics cancelation – Japan Today


A Japanese doctors’ group has urged the cancelation of the Olympics, even as Games organizers reported a surplus of applications from medics to volunteer at the virus-postponed event. With less than 10 weeks until the Tokyo Games begin and as Japan battles a surge in infections, public opinion remains strongly…


So mamy views and opinions, but how many of these views and opinions are from people who have the facts, well I am not sure.

 

But what I do see  is that there appears to be more against holding the Olympics than theree are for, so It would appear that the Games should be cancelled. For to hold the event and the pandemic really takes off it will be well too late for measures to alleviate it.

Suffering and even more deaths will occur, but will those that decide to hold the event be held to account. Even if there are, that is not sufficient for those who will have died or are suffering and their families who will have to pick up the pieces, for nothing could be sufficient compensation to cover all that.

 

Source: Tokyo doctors association calls for Olympics cancelation – Japan Today

A vision for the future of social care


I so agree, which is why I support the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

Further information can be found at https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazgo1VP3BeD4Qrpt0Xm?e=hHwlFU

This vision has been developed by people that draw on or work in social care and through extensive public audience research. It changes how people think about social care and builds public support for and optimism about investment and reform.

Our social care future

We all want a good life

We all want to live in the place we call home, with the people and things we love, in communities where we look out for one another, doing what matters to us.

Caring about each other

If we or someone we care about has a disability or health condition during our life, we might need some support to do these things. That’s the role of social care.

Drawing on support to live our lives in the way we want to

When organised well, social care helps to weave the web of relationships and support in our local communities that…

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Covid 19 my vaccine experience.


I too have had the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine and now waiting for the second injection.

The first injection did not cause me any major problems, only had some numbness, on the next day, where the injection had been, but this had gone by the following day.

I have not rushed out thinking I was now safe, but continue to shield and will do until, at least, I have the second injection. Even then I will continue to stay safe, wear a face-mask when I go out and respect Social Distancing. I also wash my hand regularly throughout the day and certainly when I come back from medical appointments, the only reason I do leave home.

Until everyone has had the full course of injections I will not feel safe to go out.

I had the injection, not only because I believe in having injections and to safeguard myself, but also to safeguard others and do my bit to see that the effects and mutations of COVID-19 are substantially reduced or even eliminated. However, I do appreciate that I and others will need regular COVID injections, just like we do for the Flu. This is not to say COVID is like the flu, as it is very much worse and could cause long-term deliberating conditions in those who are not vaccinated.

I do have an adult daughter who has a severe aversion to needles and as she has Learning Disabilities and Autism does not have the capacity to understand anything about COVID-19.

So, until there is an alternative to the injection, such as a Nasal Spray she will be open to contract COVID-19, so I owe it to her to do all I can the ensure I will not be able to pass COVID-19 onto her.

The poor side of life

Yesterday I had my Covid 19 vaccination. I had the Pfizer vaccination and I really couldn’t wait for this day to arrive.

Most of you will know that my Covid 19 and Long Covid experience has been horrendous.

I first became ill with Covid 19 last April and I quickly became extremely unwell. You can read about this in my previous blog posts. I also developed Pneumonia and pleurisy and had numerous relapses.

To say that I was excited for my vaccine was an understatement, I can never forget how ill I have been and I certainly don’t want to catch it again. Not only do I have to think about myself I also have to think about my daughters wellbeing as well.

I was virtually bedbound for around a month except for the odd trip downstairs which completely exhausted me. As a result my illness really scared my daughter…

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Frances Whiley: Another Sister Speaks For Her Brother With LD


Yet again persons with learning disabilities, (LD), are, apparently, going unnoticed by the UK Authorities, especially in Wales. This is in spite of a report in November 2020 from Public Health England,  which showed that people with learning disabilities were three to six times more likely to die from covid-19 than the general population during the pandemic’s first wave

This is when, before COVID-19, the risk of persons with LD dying earlier than persons without LD is well known and the reason the LeDeR programme with the University of Bristol, is being researched, which started on 1 July 2016 and is funded by NHS England.

So, why with all the above are persons with LD being ignored and even worse, if they went into hospital could well have a DNR (Do not resuscitate), placed on their record.

It would appear all is against persons with LD, but why?

Do these authorities feel the right to life of persons with LD should be ignored, if this is correct, then this is a very dangerous and very worrying premise, for to believe, this is how exterminations start, just look at Germany in the 1930/40s.

This needs to be stopped forthwith for persons with LD have as much right to life as anyone.

Same Difference

Since the pandemic began more than a year ago, one of my greatest fears has been losing my brother, who lives in a care home. He is in his late 20s, is severely autistic and has epilepsy, as well as other complex needs. He is extremely vulnerable. According to Public Health England, people with severe learning disabilities are six times more likely to die from Covid-19 than the general population. In my brother’s age group, the 18-34 bracket, the death rate is 30 times higher.

Then there is the added risk of where he lives. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), living in a care home is a “major factor in the increased exposure of people with learning disabilities to Covid-19”. The communal nature of these facilities, combined with how much contact is required between care workers and residents – my brother needs help with everything, from…

View original post 955 more words