Archives for category: research

Hated Government welfare tests have unleashed a “pervasive lack of trust” in the system, MPs warn today. Contracting out assessments for Personal Independence Payments and Employment and Support Allowance fuelled victims’ agony, the Commons Work and Pensions Committee reveals.

In a 71-page report, it calls on ministers to scrap the current arrangements and take tests back in house. Chairman Frank Field said: “For the majority of claimants the assessments work adequately, but a pervasive lack of trust is undermining its entire operation. “In turn, this is translating into untenable human costs to claimants and financial costs to the public purse. No one should have any doubt the process needs urgent change.”

Since 2013, 290,000 rejected claims for Personal Independence Payments or Employment and Support Allowance have been granted on appeal – 6% of all those assessed.

 

Source: PIP/ESA tests ‘trigger lack of trust in system’ [You Think]

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With the number of people living with dementia estimated to hit 1 million by 2020, Age UK is warning of an urgent and growing need to provide much better support for those who have been told they have the condition.

Despite the fact that regularly reviewed care plans should be available for everyone living with dementia, new analysis from Age UK shows that over 1 in 3 people with dementia don’t have one. The Plans are important because they are the gateway to follow up support from the NHS, and they should also help ensure that other support a person may be receiving, such as social care, is properly joined up with NHS help for their dementia.

Age UK analysed data from 7,185 GP practices in England and found that, in total, 458,461 people had a recorded diagnosis of dementia in November 2017, but only 282,573 had a new care plan or at least one care plan review on record in the last year.

Yet NHS England’s Guidance says “there is an urgent need to ensure every person who has dementia has an individual care plan” and goes on to specify that these reviews should take place once every 12 months at the minimum. The plans are supposed to set out the tailored support someone should receive, and are meant to be reviewed regularly with a health professional as a person’s condition progresses and changes. Care plans are equally important for family members who are often providing significant amounts of

 

Source: New analysis reveals that 1 in 3 people living with dementia don’t get the NHS support they are supposed to : Age UK

Report


I’m a white American, but like a majority of us, that’s only small part of the story.

In a country where the federal government is currently in the hands of so-called “nativists” like Trump and his white mostly male Republican Party backers only celebrate white roots, I like many of us have various genetic strands that include a little of what might best be called “diversity.” There is a touch of Native American on my mother’s side — hardly enough to qualify for inclusion in the Algonquin Nation, but enough to remind me and my siblings that our ancestors include both conquerers and the conquered.

Then too, while there is a direct line on both my mother’s side and my father’s side tracing back to the same Warren family that arrived on the Mayflower in 1620, there are also immigrants who came from Scotland (the Stewart Clan) and Ireland on my mother’s side, and from Germany (Kerpol) and England (the Plymptons and Lincolns) on my father’s.

For me, one of the most interesting roots is my great great grandfather, a Lindorff who left Sweden for G

 

Source: Trumpian White Supremacy Has it All Wrong : Counter Punch


Scientists today make the extraordinary revelation that the first modern Briton, who lived 300 generations ago, was black. The surprise finding of DNA tests on the UK’s oldest complete skeleton, known as Cheddar Man, show that it belonged to a man with dark curly hair, blue eyes and ‘dark to black’ skin pigmentation. The analysis of a tiny sample of ground-up skull bone revealed that the 10,000 year old man it belonged to had completely different features to the pale skin and light hair that the researchers had expected. And it demonstrates that whiter skin is a much more recent development in Europe than previously thought – evolving to help people produce more vitamin D from sunlight.

Identity implications

Source: Scientists discover that the first modern Briton had dark skin : i


Something wonderful happened about 13.8 billion years ago. Everything in the universe was created in an instant as an infinitesimally small point of energy: the Big Bang. We know that this event happened, as the universe is constantly expanding and galaxies are moving away from us. The more we peer into the past, the smaller it gets – that’s how we know it must have once been infinitesimally small, and that there must have been a beginning.

But of course there weren’t any humans around to see how it all started. What would it have been like – what would we have seen and felt? Now new research posted on the open science repository ArXiv, has investigated the amount of light available in the newborn universe to offer some clues.

The universe may seem dark and cold now, but there is a lot of light around. Humans can see some of this, but there’s also light at frequencies that we can’t see. The night sky, for example, appears dark but in fact glows at a frequency of light invisible to human eyes. Still, we can see this light using microwave detectors and it is a light that fills space and is practically exactly the same wherever we look.

 

Source: What would it have been like to witness the beginning of the universe? : The Conversation


Seasonal flu indicators high but stabilising in the UK

Influenza activity in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland appeared to be stabilising during the third week of 2018, according to the PHE’s latest Weekly National Influenza Report [1,2].

In week 3 of 2018, GP consultation rates increased slightly to 54.1 per 100,00 population, (compared with 53.1 the previous week); there were 230 new acute respiratory outbreaks reported (compared with 216 in the previous week); and the rate of influenza-confirmed hospitalisations (based on sentinel surveillance across 22 NHS Trusts in England) was 0.48 per 100,000 population (compared with 0.56 per 100,000 in the previous week). A slideset of charts and tables, illustrating these data trends, is published alongside the weekly report, on the PHE Weekly National Flu Reports webpage [3]

PHE published provisional data from the third monthly collection of influenza vaccine

 

*Source: HPR volume 12 issue 3: news and infection reports (26-27 January) – GOV.UK

 

*Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.


Trouble paying attention to people. Being constantly on the move. Invading personal space, not reading social cues well and having meltdowns. These can all be signs of both ADHD and autism. And the two conditions can occur together.

The signs of autism, also called autism spectrum disorder or ASD, can range in severity. While ADHD (also known as ADD) isn’t a spectrum disorder, like autism it can produce a range of symptoms. And each symptom can cause a range of difficulty from one child to the next. So what’s the difference between ADHD and autism?

This table breaks down some of the key differences between them.

 

Source: The Difference Between ADHD and Autism : Understood


In the first study of its kind, scientists show that bilingual children with autism spectrum disorders can switch mental gears more easily than those who can only speak one language.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a growing concern in the United States, affecting an estimated 1 in 68 children.

Despite the prevalence and years of research, there are still several unanswered questions about how and why ASD develops, and how best to manage it. Researchers are looking at these queries from all angles.

A new study gains fresh insight by approaching

 

Source: Children with autism may benefit from being bilingual : Medical News Today


Anil Gumber thought you might be interested in the following paper.  Please pass on as appropriate.  Thank you.

Anil writes:

“I hope you will find the following article (published in BMC Research Notes) useful in your activities addressing health behavioural change among ethnic minorities.

Improving prevention, monitoring and management of diabetes among ethnic minorities: contextualizing the six G’s approach

People from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are known to have an increased risk of developing diabetes and face greater barriers to accessing healthcare resources compared to their ‘white British’ counterparts. The extent of these barriers varies by demographics and different socioeconomic circumstances that people find themselves in. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a new framework to understand, disentangle and tackle these barriers so that improvements in the effectiveness of diabetes interventions for BAME communities can be achieved.

Full-text can be downloaded from: http://rdcu.be/Dx61

Anil Gumber

Principal Research Fellow, Sheffield Hallam University”

 

 


For the last 18 months 3 Family Carers of relatives with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism (Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn and Kate Chapman) have been working together with a PHd student (Rachael A Black) at the University of Sheffield (Department of Human Communication Sciences) using the framework of Co-production. This was initially to provide research for Rachael’s thesis required for her PHd, but also to have a meaningful outcome for LD Carers within Sheffield, UK

At the start of this co-production Rachael enquired through Sheffield Mencap & Gateway for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities to work with her on her PHd project. During the last 18 months we have had regular meetings at the University of Sheffield on how we would proceed with this project and what our initial outcomes would be. Initially through general discussions, which Rachael was recording, it became clear that the recurring situations was around carers communications with the range of Service Providers. Within the context of Service Providers it included Sheffield Adult Social Care through Sheffield City Council, various health providers ( being GPs, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Community Health, and many other health areas) together with the independent Care Providers including charities, voluntary and private independent providers.

So that we were not restricted around our own views we decided to create 2 surveys, 1 to be completed by LD carers reflecting on their interactions with Service Providers and the other survey to be completed by Service Providers reflecting on their interactions with LD Carers. The surveys were created on Survey Monkey and during their creation we had a number of meeting to discuss how these were to be formed, the number of questions to be included and the specific questions. When we were all satisfied with both surveys they went live on Survey Monkey and electronic links were disseminated through our various range of contacts within Sheffield, UK.

We also discussed how we wished to to use the information from these surveys in addition to the original outcome for Rachael’s thesis. and decided we would wish to do this in a form of a presentation. We looked at possible dates and venues and obtained costings and also viewed each venue and then using co-production decided which venue to book and how we would advertise the event and provide a means for LD Carers and Service Providers to book to attend the event, which we did through Eventbrite and agreed on a format for a flyer and a website (Carer Voice) and the event title being Carer Voice Working Together.

Working Together Event Presentation 2017

 

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, The Presenters from left to right, Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn, Rachael A Black and Kate Chapman

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Presenter Rachael A Black Stating the Principles of Co-production

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Carers and Service Providers working together

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Judith Gwynn answering questions at the end of the Presentation

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Kate Chapman answering questions

Carer Voice Final Notes

Thank you for coming today and now you have seen the presentation and been involved in the workshops in which carers and service providers have worked together. This is how it should be for we are all here for the same reason, to ensure vulnerable persons, be they be our relatives or not, have provision to ensure their needs are met and they can then led their own lives.

Communication is but one key, but an extremely important key and without it all that is there can fail.

With this in mind I facilitate a support group LD Carers Butty Group, also known as Central group or Butty Group, where there is also a website and a mailing/distribution list. There are other support groups and details of these can be obtained from the Carers Centre and from Cathy and Kirsty from Sheffield Mencap & Gateway (Sharing Caring Project).

If you wish to be included in the mailing/distribution list please advise your email address. While this was produced with carers in mind, it does not mean that service providers cannot be included. Information sent will include areas relating to disability both local and national as well as notes for the support meetings.

Lunch is now ready and there are some leaflets from a selection of providers please view and take away and continue to network throughout lunch.

Do not forget to put on a post it the message you are taking away from this event and an evaluation form will be emailed to you, please return with your comments.

Our thanks to

University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences for funding the event

Sheffield Central Fire Station for the room

Healthwatch Sheffield for the pens

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Chris Sterry giving the closing statement

 

After the Carer Voice : Working Together event we sent the following email with everyone who attended the event and also to those persons who could not attend but did express an interest in the event.

“We just wanted to get in touch to give you an update on the work we are doing following the Working Together Event in October.

 As a group we have met once to go through the feedback and will be meeting again in December. Where we will start drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of service based on the information you gave us.  

 In early 2018 we will email these to you for your feedback. If you would not like to receive these emails then please do let me know and I will remove your name form the mailing list.

 We are also planning to pull together a small working group in the New Year to ensure the standards are accessible and practical. If you would be interested in being in this group, please do let us know. It will consist of 2 to 3 meetings at the University of Sheffield.

 Please also find attached some information about care workers in the independent and charity sector and the flu vaccine which we hope will be of use to you.

If you would be interested in receiving a copy of the presentation we gave on the day please do get in touch and I will send this to you.

Many thanks

Rachael and Carer Voice”

Flu Vaccine for Care Workers

Supporting People with Learning Disabilities get Flu Injection

 

We have now met in December and have started drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of services based on the information given to us during the Carer Voice : Working Together event.

Further information on this will be issued within the next few months.

 

 

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