Archives for category: Social Services

Today we have published ambitious new equality objectives for 2017 – 19. Despite progress on equality, people from some equality groups are still less likely to receive good quality health and social care.

Source: New equality objectives to target inequality in health and social care | Care Quality Commission


Social workers tell us the impact their work is having on their lives outside of work

Source: 50 ways social work affects your personal life | Community Care


Regional care providers are urging their local authorities to ensure extra money announced in the budget actually gets through to frontline care services.

Source: Call to local authorities to ensure extra social care money gets to frontline | Care Industry News


Working within Social Services is not easy for Social Workers are subject to their own management demands while endeavouring to do what is best for the vulnerable person. In doing so they need to obtain all relevant facts, which they need to understand and then decide the best course of action.

Within these their judgments may be clouded by their own personal views and opinions and this should be recognised by the respective managements within social services. Any decision made should be monitored to ensure that best interest was indeed followed. In this instance was any risk assessment produced and if it was, was it shared with Aimee’s aunt an uncle.

The secrecy which social services and especially the Family Court appear to insist upon needs to be looked at, for this could also not be in the best interest of those who are vulnerable.

All areas need to be more open, honest and transparent and then this could create an atmosphere where abuse is minimised.

Abuse is not only just related to care of the individual vulnerable person, but also the power of the authorities which they proceed to use over families. These authorities need to listen and understand situations more and then act accordingly and not proceed on a judgmental basis on unproven assumptions..

When any


Ahead of the Spring Budget, Siva Anandaciva argues that A&E performance may not bounce back as quickly as expected when winter recedes.

Source: An NHS winter that never seems to end?  | The King’s Fund


I agree with your comments, however £2bn is a drop in the ocean compared to the amounts the Government have starved Local Authorities from due to the dreaded austerity cuts.

If MPs and Ministers were doing care work then there would be no problem in providing large salary increases or any other increases as austerity is not part of them. However, none of them would be capable of doing such work as you need to have common sense and be a caring person and not just look after number one.

Poppy's Place

I think I’m supposed to be grateful.

I think all of us disabled, and older people are supposed to say ‘Thank you’ to the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, for his much flaunted, much hyped boost of £2bn for Social Care in yesterday’s Spring Budget.

Well then.

Here goes…

Thank you Mr Hammond, you are so beneficent and generous.

Sure, £2bn is an awful lot of money, and, with any luck it, at least some of should help ease the Care Crisis we currently have in this country, but it can only help if it actually filters down to the people it’s supposed to be helping. My major concern is that it will be shared out amongst all the Social Services Departments, nationwide, and will just vanish into their usual, annual Social Care black hole. We, the older and disabled people who are the ones who are supposed to reap the benefit…

View original post 578 more words


Councils will receive an extra £2bn to fund adult social care over the next three years, the government has announced. Chancellor Philip Hammond said £1bn of the cash will be released in 2017-18 to allow councils to “act now” and commission more social care packages to “relieve pressures on the NHS”. The remaining funding will […]

Source: Budget 2017: Social care gets £2bn funding boost


Last week it was revealed a severely disabled man’s legal battle against a 40% cut to his personal budget had ended in failure. The High Court dismissed Luke Davey’s judicial review against Oxfordshire council. The judge acknowledged the cut could impose “unwelcome” limits on Davey’s life, but he ruled the council had acted lawfully and […]

Source: The care package changes testing the limits of the Care Act


It seems we are running out of ways to convey to the government the level of crisis that now exists in social care.

The care system has been described as “at a tipping point”, in “a deeper existential crisis”, part of a “humanitarian crisis” and, more recently, “on its knees”. Health and care leaders have pleaded with government ministers to put extra funding into social care, with some even seeing it as the priority ahead of extra funding for the NHS. Local government leaders point to a funding gap of £2.6bn by 2020 and rightly say that funding the growing needs of an ageing population cannot be left to the council taxpayer alone.

Councils prepare to cut essential services to fund adult social care,Read more Council leaders also remind us that the social care crisis is not just about older people. There are many other groups needing social care, including people with learning disabilities. People may be surprised to learn that about a third of councils’ annual social care spending, approximately £5bn, goes on supporting adults with learning disabilities.

The crisis in social care is caused by insufficient funding in the face of growing need. Cuts to council budgets have led to losses to adult social care budgets estimated by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services to be £5.5bn by the end of this financial year. Many councils have had to deal with cuts to their budgets of 40% or more since 2010. They have also faced additional costs from the Care Act passed in 2014, the introduction of the national living wage for the care sector and continued rising demand for care.

The Kings Fund has recently said that adult social care is “rapidly becoming little more than a threadbare safety net for the poorest and most needy older and disabled people”. As we approach the budget and with talk of some additional funding for social care, it is time to ask ourselves if we accept this.

Source: Social care is on its knees. We all have a stake in its future | Barbara Keeley | Opinion | The Guardian


In a Conservative Britain, the catchphrase is “Everyone for themselves” – so we should all understand perfectly well why they couldn’t give a flying fig for social care. The…

Source: Social? Care? Those are words the Tories hate – of course they have abdicated responsibility for it | Vox Political

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